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How to close our amigurumis

Do you have difficulties fastening off your amigurumis? Do not miss this tutorial on How to Close our amigurumis.

Fastening off the pieces of our amigurumis correctly is an important task, not only so that the stuff does not come out due to a badly closed last round, but also so that it is aesthetically beautiful.

When we crochet our piece in rounds, with spiral rounds and beginning with the magic ring, the ideal is to try to achieve that there are no differences between the last round and the first. Closing the last round can be somewhat difficult, since we usually do not have enough space to decrease the stitches with the crochet hook.

How do we do it then?

We have to use the yarn needle, joining the remaining stitches until we completely close the piece.

Let’s see it step by step. You will see that it is very simple:

1. Once the last round is over, you must prepare to start closing. To do this, work 1 slip stitch in the next stitch and tie a knot over it. Cut the thread, leaving enough tail to sew around the last round.

2. Thread the yarn needle with the yarn and pass it through the front  loop of the first 2 stitches as a decrease. To do this, take the 2 loops together and thread the needle through them. Pull the thread a little. You have already joined the first 2 stitches.

3. Continue taking the next front 2 loops at a time, passing the needle through them to join until you reach the last 2. Pass through them in the same way, but this time form a final knot. Now you have closed the last round.

4. All that remains is to fasten off losing the excess thread inside the piece. Introduce it through the center of this last round that you have just closed, go through the amigurumi and cut.

Easy, right? And the result has been perfect.

How to close our amigurumis

This is how I do it, and you? Tell us your method to close your amigurumis in the comments!

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How to sew the arms of our amigurumis

Sew the arms of our amigurumis

Are you looking for your amigurumis to have a natural posture? Do you find the raised arms in the shape of a cross unsightly? Don’t miss this tutorial: Sew the arms of our amigurumis

When finishing an amigurumi it is very important that we sew the pieces correctly, because their final appearance depends on it. A poorly sewn piece can easily come off and cause problems. Similarly, a poorly placed can make it ugly and spoil its design.

Sewing the arms of an amigurumi seems simple, but many times they can be too upright, in the shape of a cross, making the design ugly.

Today I am going to show you how to sew the arms so that our amigurumi does not have a forced appearance and at the same time, its arms maintain movement.

In my designs, the arm piece is left open, that is, we do not close its last round, which helps us to sew them in a simple way. Let’s see how:

1. Put the arm in place with a pin.

2. Look at the last round of the arm as if it had 2 parts: the upper half (shoulder) and the lower half (armpit).

One trick to avoid stiffness is to not overstuff the end of the arm.

3. Sew the top half stitches to the body on the row you placed it on.

Continue sewing around the piece to finish at the bottom that you need to sew lower (2-3 rows lower).

In this way, the arm is united, but continues with the open form, which allows its mobility.

4. To finish off, insert the excess yarn from the top to lose it in the fabric. That way the arm will be a little lower.

Sew the arms of our amigurumis

As you can see, in a simple way you will ensure that your amigurumis retain a natural appearance and maintain the movement of their arms.

I hope you liked this tutorial about Sew the arms of our amigurumis and above all it was useful to you.

See you soon!

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Video tutorial: How to sew the parts of an amigurumi

I am very excited to show you the video tutorial How to sew the parts of an amigurumi that our friend from Ylanas Yecla has made. You can see how to assemble the pieces of Baby Taz, your favorite character from the Baby Looney Tunes collection.

It’s great, right?

You can find the patterns of Baby Taz and his friends: Bugs Bunny, Lola Bunny, Tweety, Sylvester, Road runner, Coyote and Daffy Duck here in our store:

Video tutorial: How to sew the parts of an amigurumi

As you can see with the Baby Taz example, the patterns in the Baby Looney Tunes collection are very easy to crochet and easy to assemble.

In addition, they are perfect for the little ones, both for their size and for their design. No hard materials are used. You can crochet them simply with a hook, yarn and fiber fill. No hard parts (buttons, zippers,…). All “soft”.

Don’t forget to visit the Ylanas Yecla online store that has a lot of products so that we can crochet our favorite amigurumis and many other things at incredible prices.

And so you don’t miss anything, you can also follow her on Instagram @ylanas_yecla and on Facebook

I hope you like the video tutorial How to sew the parts of an amigurumi and above all that it is useful to you.

See you soon!

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Morphology of a crochet hook

As you know, to crochet amigurumis the hook is of special importance, since a bad choice of the same can lead us to obtain a bad result, hinder our work or even cause injuries.

This time I don’t want to talk to you about the different types of hooks, designs, materials … I will leave that for another moment.

Today we are going to start with the basics, with the parts that make it up and what each one is for.

Can you tell me how many parts a crochet hook has? And their names?

Let’s discover the Morphology of a crochet hook.

A standard hook is made up of 7 parts. Let’s see what they are:

Morphology of a crochet hook

1. Point or Head: It is the end of the hook that we insert into the fabric. We use it to hook the yarn and crochet the stitches.

In turn, it is made up of:

Morphology of a crochet hook

-Mouth: Hold the yarn when crocheting the stitches.

-Hook: Prevents the yarn from coming out of the mouth when crocheting.

2. Throat: Guide the thread into the work area.

3. Work area: It holds the loops and is very important because it determines the size of the stitches. The size of the hook tells us precisely the diameter of the work area.

Morphology of a crochet hook

4. Thumb rest: It is the flat part in which we place the thumb or another finger and thus be able to handle the hook. In this part usually appears the numbering or measurement of the hook.

Morphology of a crochet hook

5. Handle: It is the final end of the hook and is used to manage it with the palm of the hand or the other fingers, depending on the way in which we hold it.

As you can see, each part of the hook has its reason for being and knowing the morphology of a crochet hook will help us to improve our work.

Until next time!

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How to know the weight of the yarn

How to know the weight of the yarn quickly and easily is an important matter for all of us who like to crochet.

As you know, one of the most important characteristics of my patterns is that the resulting amigurumis are “totally soft”. I do not use hard elements such as wires, buttons, zippers or even safety eyes. You can crochet them only with wool or yarn, a crochet hook and fiberfill.

Since these are the only materials that I use, it is essential that they be the most suitable to achieve the desired result.

There are many of you who ask me what type of yarn I use and since we are all from different places, sometimes it is difficult for me to explain and talk about centimeters, inches and categories according to their thickness.

Today I am going to talk about yarns, more specifically, how to know the weight of the yarn when you do not have any reference, for example, if you have a mysterious ball of yarn of which you have lost the label that specifies its characteristics.

But first, there are some things you should know about yarns to make it easier for you to choose the right one when crocheting your amigurumis.

Yarns are classified into several categories, but unfortunately, there is no single method to do so.

In general, there are:

The standards of the CYC (Craft Yarn Council) that represents the most prominent members of the yarn industry in the United States.

Depending on the weight of the yarn, we can classify it into the following categories:

The classification according to the number of plies that the yarn has. This system is the one used in the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand.

The problem with this classification is that it does not determine the thickness of the yarn, but rather the number of strands that are twisted to form it. There is the possibility that a yarn of 5 strands (5 ply) may be thinner than a yarn of 3 (3 ply), by the mere fact that each strand is of a lesser thickness or have been spun with greater tension between them.

• Wraps per inch method (WPI)

As its name suggests, it is about classifying the yarn according to the wraps of the same that fit in an inch or what is the same, in 2.5 cm.

It is a very useful method to determine the weight of that mysterious ball of yarn without a label that you want to use, but you must bear in mind that it is not exact, since there are factors that can alter the measurement.

To use it you need:

• A rule.

• Something to wrap the yarn with uniform thickness. You can use, for example, a pencil or a pen.

It’s easy:

1. You must wrap the yarn so that each strand is next to each other, that is, they do not overlap. Do it carefully, do not tighten too much, or leave it loose, since you could vary the result too much.

2. With the ruler measure 1 inch or what is the same 2.5 cm. That is the length you should wrap.

3. When you have it, count the wraps you have made and guide yourself through this cheat sheet. Depending on the number of wraps, this will be the weight and category to which your yarn belongs.

If you have doubts, first try to do it with a yarn whose weight you know.

Let’s see some examples:

This picture shows the yarn that I normally use in my patterns. Using this method, I have made 17 WPI. That places it in category 2 Fine.

How to know the weight of the yarn

This other, on the other hand, is much thicker and for that reason I have only made 9 WPI. It belongs to category 5 Bulky.

How to know the weight of the yarn

Finally, we have a much finer yarn with which I have managed to make 28 WPI. It belongs to category 0 Lace.

How to know the weight of the yarn

As you can see, it is a very simple method, but remember that it is not exact, but only an aid that will help you guide yourself.

Until next time!

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Straight edges: Importance of turning chains

Whether you are a beginner or if your level is more advanced, it is important that you have some basic crochet knowledge. This will help you easily follow a pattern or even adapt it to your needs. In today’s tutorial: Straight Edges: Importance of Turning Chains, I want to talk to you about one of the basic stitches: The chain, more specifically The Turning Chain and the importance of its correct use when making the pieces of our amigurumis straighter.

Many of you have asked me about this stitch that I use frequently in my patterns when crocheting in rows. Let’s see what it is:

A turning chain is just that, a chain that we crochet before turning and starting a new row. Its function is to provide us with a certain gap or height so that we can start crocheting at the first stitch in the row and thus keep the edge straight. Their presence does not count when determining the total count of stitches in the row, but their absence does mean the decrease of one of the points in the row: the first.

You will see it more clearly with an example:

We need to crochet a straight piece 12 sc long. For this we start with 12 chains?

If we work 12 chains, when we return crocheting sc over the chains, we will not be able to start in the first chain, there is no space to do it, so we must crochet over the second and when completing the row we will have 11 sc instead of 12.

To have the row of 12 sc, we must start with 13 chains and use the last of them to gain that space we need. This last chain will therefore be a Turning Chain.

When crochet consecutive rows, if we want to keep the edges of our piece straight, we must use the turning chain in the same way, that is, when we reach the end of the row, we make a chain that allows us to turn and start crocheting in the first sc.

Turning chain at the end of the row
Straight edges: Importance of turning chains
Turn and start crocheting in the first single crochet
Straight edges: Importance of turning chains
With turning chain
Without turning chain

In our example, we have used single crochets, but what if the rows we need have to be worked with other points? In these cases, we have to take into account the height of these stitches when using the turning chains to gain the necessary space and not fall short or excess.

We have already seen that 1 turning chain is used for a row crocheted with single crochets. The next stitch in height is the half double crochet. For it we will continue using 1 chain.

With the double crochet, on the other hand, it will be necessary to add a turning chain. Before turning and starting a new row, we will have to chain 2.

Chain 2, turn and start crocheting in the third chain

Following our example:

If we need to work a 12 double crochet piece, we will have to chain 14 and start crocheting in the third chain, using the last 2 chains as if they were the first double crochet in the row.

In the same way, when we continue crocheting rows, we must continue using 2 chains as a double crochet in the corners to keep the edges straight.

Chain 2 as a first double crochet
Straight edges: Importance of turning chains
Chain 2, turn and begin in the first stitch
Straight edges: Importance of turning chains
With 2 turning chains and double crochet
Without turning chains

If with the double crochet we have to use 2 chains, with a treble crochet we will have to use 3 and crochet in the same way: Chain 15 to have a row of 12 treble crochet and 3 turning chains in the following rows.

Chain 3, turn and begin in the fourth chain
Straight edges: Importance of turning chains
Chain 3, turn and begin in the first stitch
Straight edges: Importance of turning chains
With 3 turning chains and treble crochet
Without turning chains

Recap:

Straight edges: Importance of turning chains

As you can see, to get straight edges you need to take into account the importance of the turning chains.

Did you like it? It’s not difficult, is it?

Until next time! ?

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How to crochet the union of the fingers of our Amigurumis

People, animals, objects… when it comes to designing an amigurumi everything is possible with a little imagination and some basic ideas.

This time I want to show you how to join several tubular pieces, such as fingers, so that you can easily start from them, giving rise to many other parts of your amigurumis.

As an example we are going to join 3 pieces, but you can join much more. Just keep in mind that it is a linear union, that is, each piece will be next to another and at the same level.

We start by crocheting each piece separately. We will make simple pieces, all 3 of the same size:

1. Work 6 sc in magic ring.
2. to 5. 1 sc in each st (6).
Crochet 2 pieces completely and fasten off, that is, cut the thread. Finish the third piece also completely, but don’t cut the thread to continue crocheting on the other two and thus be able to join them. Continue reading How to crochet the union of the fingers of our Amigurumis

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How to change the size of your Amigurumis

Hello!

Many times you have found the pattern of an amigurumi that you love, that is perfect, just what you wanted, but when you see the size, it is too big or too small and it isn’t suitable… What can you do?

Don’t worry, this doesn’t have to be an unsolved problem. In a simple way you will be able to adapt the size of the amigurumi to your needs, whether you are a beginner or have a more advanced level.

We are going to see the solutions, from the simplest to the most complex. Continue reading How to change the size of your Amigurumis

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Little Lulu Amigurumi Videotutorial, by Demetra Bogri

Hello!

Today I want to talk to you about something that has happened to me a few days ago and that has made me very excited:

The first videotutorial of one of my amigurumis!: Little Lulú Amigurumi Pattern!

But no, I didn’t make it, but Demetra Bogri, the magnificent weaver of 4elli.com, and everything was the result of chance … A bad translation of my pattern of Son Goku on the blog forced her to contact with me and talking, talking, she proposed to do the videotutorial of one of my patterns.

I could’nt believe it!!! Of course, I love the idea! So we started the collaboration.

Continue reading Little Lulu Amigurumi Videotutorial, by Demetra Bogri

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How to Hide the Color Changes in your Amigurumis

Do you have difficulties to changing colors in crochet?
Is there a gap in the fabric that disfigures it?

Amigurumis are crocheted in rounds being the most used way to make them the spiral technique.

That is, instead of closing each round independently, we continue crocheting the next one.

By this way, the stitches move to form the spiral, instead of remaining above the stitches of the previous round.

When we change color, when we crochet in continuous rounds in spiral, that displacement of the stitches causes a gap in the fabric, an unevenness that disfigures the design.

It is a detail that can make a difference.

Today I am going to teach you 2 tips so that, in a simple way, the color changes are linear and have no unevenness:

Continue reading How to Hide the Color Changes in your Amigurumis